What to Look for in a Luxury Watch

Current style trends for Swiss timepieces and luxury watches not only praise simplicity, they are less complicated. Literally.

Watchmakers today are keeping a watch on current economic indicators, so to speak -and are reacting to a less robust market in a classic way. First and foremost, they are embracing simplicity and a return to the tried-and-true, after a digital revolution that has fueled design creativity and precision innovation for some time now. “Classic” watches are in demand, recalling accolades such as elegance and sophistication while keeping production costs in check. This year, the line between luxury and the everyday is becoming more blurred. Experts say watchmakers face a new dilemma, “how convince customers that while luxury may be more accessible, it is just as desirable.” Here’s a look at what to look for in a luxury watch.

Sign of the Times

  • Resurgence of classic styles – in steel, precious metals such as red gold and white gold, and bronze. Look for carbon in sports watches, for its ultra-lightness and resistance.
  • Vintage has all the buzz – moving to a full-blown trend and fashion phenomenon, with reissues of icons to neo-retro pieces and anniversary editions.
  • A class of their own – functional watches with a crisp, clean design are popular in the pre-owned market.
  • Slimness still matters – extra-thin calibres remains one of the measures of elegance in a watch.
  • Classic colors dominate – bright colors give way to a subdued palette of blue, black or white.
  • Complications are less complicated – the chronograph is preferred in terms of functionality, often interpreted as a regatta countdown or combined with a perpetual calendar. Striking watches and the tourbillon -a celebrated complication that means “whirlwind” in French and demonstrates watchmaking virtuosity- have a lower profile, as does métiers d’art embellishment. However, “This rekindled romance with simple watches, possibly with the poetic addition of a moon phase, can neither detract from nor diminish the aura which the complication watch holds for collectors,” say experts.
  • High-priced skeletonwork – is less in evidence. Form watches are the exception.
  • New ways to improve precision – despite a perceived limit that has been reached and may be difficult to exceed, chronometry benchmarks proliferate.

Women Rule

Compared with the men’s segments, women’s watches have the greatest potential for growth. Women watch-buyers are now a priority for brands. “Women will no longer make do with a moon phase display here or a sprinkling of diamonds there,” experts say. “They want watches in their image: that of a woman who (also) wears her timepiece like a man!”

Precious Interpretation of Fine Watchmaking

Each year, makers of Swiss timepieces and luxury brands meet at two celebrated gatherings: The Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie and Baselworld. This year at the 27th Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie, watchmakers realized the fallout after exports fell 10% in 2016, looking for ways to position fine watchmaking as understated, affordable luxury as a personal experience. The 100th edition of the Baselworld watch and jewelry fair in 2017 saw 200 exhibitors pulling out, leaving a total of 1,300 to lead a return to the art’s core values.

With this in mind, the Cultural Council of the Fondation de la Haute Horlogerie (FHH) in Switzerland created The White Paper on Fine Watchmaking, a guide book to define what really constitutes fine watchmaking.

Four categories are covered: Historic Maisons, Contemporary Brands, Luxury Brands and Artisan Creators. Seven areas of expertise are examined: R&D and Production, Style and Design, History and DNA, Distribution and After-Sales Service, Collectors, Brand Image and Communication and Training. Each brand is evaluated against 28 objectives and measurable criteria across each of these areas these criteria by Cultural Council experts, repeated every two to three years to stay current with developments in the industry.

Partner with Indy Facets for New and Pre-Owned Luxury Watches

A true marvel of engineering dating back hundreds of years, a fine Swiss timepiece is a miniature machine requiring nothing but movement to keep accurate time to within a few seconds per day. Indy Facets will help you acquire an authentic timepiece at a great value compared to a traditional retailer. We are not contractually bound by manufacturer’s suggested retail pricing or discounting guidelines, and we only work with reputable dealers for pre-owned watches who not only stand by the authenticity, they send us watches in the best condition possible. If there is a watch or timepiece you have been dreaming of owning, please contact us today. We would love to find it for you! Let’s Get Started!

Indy Facets – Everyone’s Private Jeweler

Indy Facets seamlessly blends the expertise and full service of a traditional jewelry store with the value and convenience of a personal jeweler experience. We give you the face-to-face interaction with an expert that you deserve, in a private setting where you can relax and feel comfortable. Owner/Designer Shaun Goodyear and his team have earned an excellent reputation as Indiana’s private jeweler for engagement rings, custom design, investment grade diamonds, luxury Swiss timepieces, estate jewelry, jewelry repair and the highest level of customer service, available to you from an onsite, state-of-the-art Custom Design Studio and Gemological Laboratory by private appointment only. You are guaranteed a unique, fun and exciting experience without the hype, pressure, judgment or uncertainty associated with other jewelry shopping options. We schedule appointments at your convenience, and are usually available evenings and weekends, too. Call (317) 296-6273 or schedule online, www.indyfacets.com/schedule.

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